Lincoln Wore Lifts

Javert ♐ She/Her 19 Aro/Ace

Professional Roger Davis appreciator

I'm going to marry Scarlett Johansson and no one will stop me



ZELDAS   SOME   BODY ONCE TOLD ME
Reblogged from whatsanelounor-deactivated20130
Reblogged from gaaaaaaaaaambit

gaaaaaaaaaambit:

logicaltribble answered: draw cyclops toasting bread

(via thoroughly-hawkward)

Reblogged from zeeewa
zeeewa:

the slam, the jam, the fucking dodge ram

zeeewa:

the slam, the jam, the fucking dodge ram

Reblogged from laireshi
laireshi:

Aww, Rocket.
Guardians of the Galaxy 17

laireshi:

Aww, Rocket.

Guardians of the Galaxy 17

(via thoroughly-hawkward)

Reblogged from brea-t-h-less
brea-t-h-less:

j-shore(L)

brea-t-h-less:

j-shore(L)

Reblogged from meanwolfs
Reblogged from trigonometry-is-my-bitch
trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

Fold a piece of paper in half 103 times, and its wider than the observable universe.
this is due to exponential growth; the increase in previous thickness is doubled each time you fold the piece of paper again. physically you could probably only fold a piece of paper about 7 - 8 times on your own.

Given a paper large enough—and enough energy—you can fold it as many times as you want. If you fold it 103 times, the thickness of your paper will be larger than the observable Universe; 93 billion light-years distance.

How can a 0.0039-inch-thick paper get to be as thick as the Universe?


The answer is simple: Exponential growth. The average paper thickness in 1/10th of a millimeter (0.0039 inches.) If you perfectly fold the paper in half, you will double its thickness.
Folding the paper in half a third time will get you about the thickness of a nail.
Seven folds will be about the thickness of a notebook of 128 pages.
10 folds and the paper will be about the width of a hand.
23 folds will get you to one kilometer—3,280 feet.
30 folds will get you to space. Your paper will be now 100 kilometers high.
Keep folding it. 42 folds will get you to the Moon. With 51 you will burn in the Sun.
Now fast forward to 81 folds and your paper will be 127,786 light-years, almost as thick as the Andromeda Galaxy, estimated at 141,000 light-years across.
90 folds will make your paper 130.8 million light-years across, bigger than the Virgo Supercluster, estimated at 110 million light-years. The Virgo Supercluster contains the Local Galactic Group—with Andromeda and our own Milky Way—and about 100 other galaxy groups.
And finally, at 103 folds, you will get outside of the observable Universe, which is estimated at 93 billion light-years in diameters.

[source]

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

Fold a piece of paper in half 103 times, and its wider than the observable universe.

this is due to exponential growth; the increase in previous thickness is doubled each time you fold the piece of paper again. physically you could probably only fold a piece of paper about 7 - 8 times on your own.

Given a paper large enough—and enough energy—you can fold it as many times as you want. If you fold it 103 times, the thickness of your paper will be larger than the observable Universe; 93 billion light-years distance.

How can a 0.0039-inch-thick paper get to be as thick as the Universe?

The answer is simple: Exponential growth. The average paper thickness in 1/10th of a millimeter (0.0039 inches.) If you perfectly fold the paper in half, you will double its thickness.

Folding the paper in half a third time will get you about the thickness of a nail.

Seven folds will be about the thickness of a notebook of 128 pages.

10 folds and the paper will be about the width of a hand.

23 folds will get you to one kilometer—3,280 feet.

30 folds will get you to space. Your paper will be now 100 kilometers high.

Keep folding it. 42 folds will get you to the Moon. With 51 you will burn in the Sun.

Now fast forward to 81 folds and your paper will be 127,786 light-years, almost as thick as the Andromeda Galaxy, estimated at 141,000 light-years across.

90 folds will make your paper 130.8 million light-years across, bigger than the Virgo Supercluster, estimated at 110 million light-years. The Virgo Supercluster contains the Local Galactic Group—with Andromeda and our own Milky Way—and about 100 other galaxy groups.

And finally, at 103 folds, you will get outside of the observable Universe, which is estimated at 93 billion light-years in diameters.

[source]

Reblogged from astronomicalwonders
astronomicalwonders:

A Rose in Space - NGC 2237
This flower-shaped nebula, also known by the less romantic name NGC 2237, is a huge star-forming cloud of dust and gas in our Milky Way galaxy. Estimates of the nebula’s distance vary from 4,500 to 5,000 light-years away.
At the center of the flower is a cluster of young stars called NGC 2244. The most massive stars produce huge amounts of ultraviolet radiation, and blow strong winds that erode away the nearby gas and dust, creating a large, central hole. The radiation also strips electrons from the surrounding hydrogen gas, ionizing it and creating what astronomers call an HII region.
Credit: NASA/JPL

astronomicalwonders:

A Rose in Space - NGC 2237

This flower-shaped nebula, also known by the less romantic name NGC 2237, is a huge star-forming cloud of dust and gas in our Milky Way galaxy. Estimates of the nebula’s distance vary from 4,500 to 5,000 light-years away.

At the center of the flower is a cluster of young stars called NGC 2244. The most massive stars produce huge amounts of ultraviolet radiation, and blow strong winds that erode away the nearby gas and dust, creating a large, central hole. The radiation also strips electrons from the surrounding hydrogen gas, ionizing it and creating what astronomers call an HII region.

Credit: NASA/JPL

why do things

Reblogged from blackfashion

blackfashion:

Herieth Paul, the face of Anthropologie’s Spring 2014 catalogue lookbook. 
www.anthropologie.com

(via certified-daydreamer)